4 Questions to Ask a Cardiologist

4 Questions to Ask a Cardiologist

There are some questions you might want to ask a cardiologist like one of ours here at Bridgewater Primary Care & Cardiology in West Bridgewater, MA. Visit us for guidance about cardiac health. For more information, call us or book an appointment online. We are located at 711 W Center St West Bridgewater, MA 02379.

4 Questions to Ask a Cardiologist Near Me in West Bridgewater, MA
4 Questions to Ask a Cardiologist Near Me in West Bridgewater, MA

Table of Contents:

How does my family history affect my heart health?
What should the ideal blood pressure be?
What is my cholesterol level and how does this affect my heart?
Am I experiencing a heart symptom due to my age, gender, or weight?

Cardiology is the branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Cardiologists perform diagnostic tests to assess the health of the heart, manage patients with heart disease, and may even perform surgeries to repair or replace damaged heart tissue. Cardiologists can specialize in areas such as interventional cardiology, which involves the use of drugs and devices to treat and manage heart disease, or in cardiac surgery, which involves the repair and replacement of heart structures such as the heart valves and coronary arteries. Cardiologists also commonly specialize in the care of patients with a specific type of heart diseases such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats).

How does my family history affect my heart health?


A family history of heart disease can raise an individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, heart disease is a complex disease, and the risk factors that increase the risk of heart disease are also the ones that can, in many cases, be controlled by making lifestyle changes. Eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and avoiding tobacco, alcohol, and certain drugs can reduce the risk of developing heart disease. In cases where an individual’s family history of heart disease makes it more likely that they will develop cardiovascular disease, the patient should receive the appropriate preventative care, including disease screenings, disease development monitoring, early treatment management, and lifestyle modifications.

What should the ideal blood pressure be?


Blood pressure is measured by reading two pressures: diastolic, which is the pressure when the heart muscle is relaxed and systolic, the
pressure when the heart muscle is contracting or pumping. Ideally, blood pressure should be below 120mm/Hg systolic pressure and 80mm/Hg diastolic pressure; this is considered normal. A systolic pressure between 120-129mm/Hg and diastolic below 80mm/Hg is considered elevated blood pressure. Stage 1 high blood pressure (hypertension) is defined as a systolic pressure between 130-139mm/Hg or diastolic pressure between 80-89 mm/Hg. Stage 2 high blood pressure (hypertension) is defined as systolic pressure higher than 140mm/Hg or diastolic pressure higher than 90 mm/Hg.

What is my cholesterol level and how does this affect my heart?


Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is produced in the liver. It is vital for the production of hormones and for the formation of cell membranes and nerve synapses. Cholesterol is carried in the bloodstream by lipoproteins, which impart the cholesterol to cells, where it is used as a building material for cell membranes and as a precursor for hormones such as testosterone and cortisol. Each cell has the ability to manufacture its own cholesterol, and most cells in the body will manufacture more cholesterol when more is needed.

A person’s cholesterol level is an important indicator of heart health. Current guidelines recommend that a person’s total cholesterol should be less than 200mg/dl, with a further distinction between the ‘good’ cholesterol (HDL) and the ‘bad’ cholesterol (LDL). Someone with a cholesterol level of 202, with an HDL level of 41, and an LDL level of 139, means that they are at an increased risk of developing heart disease, which will need to be addressed through lifestyle changes and medication.

Am I experiencing a heart symptom due to my age, gender, or weight?


Age, gender, and weight can all have an impact on the development of heart disease. Heart disease affects both men and women and is the number one cause of death in both genders. Age plays a significant role in the risk of developing heart disease, with increased risk at higher ages. Lastly, weight has a big impact on health, especially heart health; higher body weight is associated with developing heart disease, as well as diabetes. The cardiologist at Bridgewater Primary Care & Cardiology is dedicated to helping you with all of your heart-related needs. Call us today to book an appointment with our cardiologist, or visit our clinic conveniently located at 711 West Center Street, West Bridgewater, MA 02379. We serve patients from West Bridgewater MA, Bridgewater MA, Taunton MA, Middleborough MA, Plymouth MA, Pembroke MA, Braintree MA, Mansfield MA, Stoughton MA, Brockton MA, Wareham MA, Somerset MA, Attleboro MA, Abington MA, and surrounding areas. We look forward to serving you!